firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
23 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

Bernardo Barros-2
Hello

I have a quick question. I have an old MOTU Ultralite that works well
with a thinkpad, which has a firewire I/O. Current Thinkpads don't have
firewire, but some have thunderbolt. My old soundcard would work on a
new thinkpad with an adapter, like it does with other OS's?

Thanks!
Bernardo
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Kastrup
Bernardo Barros <[hidden email]> writes:

> Hello
>
> I have a quick question. I have an old MOTU Ultralite that works well
> with a thinkpad, which has a firewire I/O. Current Thinkpads don't
> have firewire, but some have thunderbolt. My old soundcard would work
> on a new thinkpad with an adapter, like it does with other OS's?

Would a Firewire Expresscard be an option?  That's what I currently use
on a T61.  The Expresscard I currently use has a "TI chipset" and won't
work properly unless I boot with it (after doing that, you can usually
disconnect it and reconnect while the laptop is suspended: hotplugging
tends not to work).  This tends to work a bit more reliably
(disregarding the hotplugging puzzle) than the built-in Ricoh Firewire
interface.

When you don't have a card yet, I think it likely makes sense going for
one supporting 800Mbps.  Not because there would be any use for that
speed with most soundcards, but because it will more likely land you
with a more modern chipset making less trouble in the PCIe department.
Also the issue date will be closer to the age of the "new Firewire
stack".

Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?

--
David Kastrup



_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Jones


On October 3, 2017 11:50:07 AM HST, David Kastrup <[hidden email]> wrote:

>Bernardo Barros <[hidden email]> writes:
>
>> Hello
>>
>> I have a quick question. I have an old MOTU Ultralite that works well
>> with a thinkpad, which has a firewire I/O. Current Thinkpads don't
>> have firewire, but some have thunderbolt. My old soundcard would work
>> on a new thinkpad with an adapter, like it does with other OS's?
>
>Would a Firewire Expresscard be an option?  That's what I currently use
>on a T61.  The Expresscard I currently use has a "TI chipset" and won't
>work properly unless I boot with it (after doing that, you can usually
>disconnect it and reconnect while the laptop is suspended: hotplugging
>tends not to work).  This tends to work a bit more reliably
>(disregarding the hotplugging puzzle) than the built-in Ricoh Firewire
>interface.
>
>When you don't have a card yet, I think it likely makes sense going for
>one supporting 800Mbps.  Not because there would be any use for that
>speed with most soundcards, but because it will more likely land you
>with a more modern chipset making less trouble in the PCIe department.
>Also the issue date will be closer to the age of the "new Firewire
>stack".
>
>Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?

I don't think so. My 2-year-old laptop only offers USB ports and an SD card slot.

I understand that SD cards can be other things than storage - I think there are SD wifi cards, for example.

I wonder - could an adaptor connect a Firewire device to USB-C or Thunderbolt port?

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com

Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

Charles Z Henry
On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 5:49 PM, David W. Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> On October 3, 2017 11:50:07 AM HST, David Kastrup <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>Bernardo Barros <[hidden email]> writes:
>>Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?
>
> I don't think so. My 2-year-old laptop only offers USB ports and an SD card slot.
>
> I understand that SD cards can be other things than storage - I think there are SD wifi cards, for example.

The SD WiFi cards are a more exotic beast altogether than a peripheral
device.  They are ~70MHz Linux computers all on their own:
https://hackaday.com/2016/06/30/transcend-wifi-sd-card-is-a-tiny-linux-server/
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

Paul Davis
In reply to this post by David Jones
as a clarification, perhaps: thunderbolt, in essence, is just a way to "export" the PCI(x) bus to outside the chassis, with safe hot-plugging.

connecting via thunderbolt is semantically and functionally almost precisely equivalent to plugging into the backplace of the motherboard.

On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 6:49 PM, David W. Jones <[hidden email]> wrote:


On October 3, 2017 11:50:07 AM HST, David Kastrup <[hidden email]> wrote:
>Bernardo Barros <[hidden email]> writes:
>
>> Hello
>>
>> I have a quick question. I have an old MOTU Ultralite that works well
>> with a thinkpad, which has a firewire I/O. Current Thinkpads don't
>> have firewire, but some have thunderbolt. My old soundcard would work
>> on a new thinkpad with an adapter, like it does with other OS's?
>
>Would a Firewire Expresscard be an option?  That's what I currently use
>on a T61.  The Expresscard I currently use has a "TI chipset" and won't
>work properly unless I boot with it (after doing that, you can usually
>disconnect it and reconnect while the laptop is suspended: hotplugging
>tends not to work).  This tends to work a bit more reliably
>(disregarding the hotplugging puzzle) than the built-in Ricoh Firewire
>interface.
>
>When you don't have a card yet, I think it likely makes sense going for
>one supporting 800Mbps.  Not because there would be any use for that
>speed with most soundcards, but because it will more likely land you
>with a more modern chipset making less trouble in the PCIe department.
>Also the issue date will be closer to the age of the "new Firewire
>stack".
>
>Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?

I don't think so. My 2-year-old laptop only offers USB ports and an SD card slot.

I understand that SD cards can be other things than storage - I think there are SD wifi cards, for example.

I wonder - could an adaptor connect a Firewire device to USB-C or Thunderbolt port?

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com

Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Jones
In reply to this post by Charles Z Henry


On October 3, 2017 1:20:45 PM HST, Charles Z Henry <[hidden email]> wrote:

>On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 5:49 PM, David W. Jones <[hidden email]>
>wrote:
>>
>>
>> On October 3, 2017 11:50:07 AM HST, David Kastrup <[hidden email]>
>wrote:
>>>Bernardo Barros <[hidden email]> writes:
>>>Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?
>>
>> I don't think so. My 2-year-old laptop only offers USB ports and an
>SD card slot.
>>
>> I understand that SD cards can be other things than storage - I think
>there are SD wifi cards, for example.
>
>The SD WiFi cards are a more exotic beast altogether than a peripheral
>device.  They are ~70MHz Linux computers all on their own:
>https://hackaday.com/2016/06/30/transcend-wifi-sd-card-is-a-tiny-linux-server/

Ah, thanks! Fascinating!

So how about a similar tiny linux computer that serves Firewire data & commands between the Firewire device and the SD port?

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com

Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Jones
In reply to this post by David Jones


On October 3, 2017 1:02:25 PM HST, Bernardo Barros <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 10/3/17 18:49, David W. Jones wrote:
> > rds, for example.
> >
> > I wonder - could an adaptor connect a Firewire device to USB-C or
> Thunderbolt port?
>
> It's possible on mac-OS, you can plug any firewire sound-card with an
> adapter to Thunderbolt 3.
>
> I just want to know if that's the case on Linux, since no laptop has
> firewire anymore.

Sending back to the list.

I wonder if one of the FW=>Thunderbolt adaptors would work to connect to a non-Mac?

I'd like to know, too, since I have a Firewire audio device sitting at home unused since the demise of my old Toshiba laptop and its Firewire port.

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com

Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

Michael Jarosch
Am Dienstag, den 03.10.2017, 14:49 -1000 schrieb David W. Jones:

> I wonder if one of the FW=>Thunderbolt adaptors would work to connect
> to a non-Mac?

Assuming, Pauls conclusion is right (and it's the same thing they say
on the FFADO-list, as well): If the chipset on the adaptor is supported
by linux (most TI ones are a good bed AFAIK) it will work.

I don't think there will ever be a USB2Firewire - and if there will be
one, I don't think it will be capable to realise realtime-audio.

Greets!
Mitsch
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Kastrup
In reply to this post by Paul Davis
Paul Davis <[hidden email]>
writes:

> as a clarification, perhaps: thunderbolt, in essence, is just a way to
> "export" the PCI(x) bus to outside the chassis, with safe
> hot-plugging.

Firewire Expresscards are basically using one PCIx lane: there are PCIx
cards for desktop computers accepting Expresscards that basically just
put the wires through (and aren't good at hotplugging).  They may or may
not also have a USB receptable in order to provide a USB port to the
Expresscard (Expresscards can choose whether to talk via PCIx or USB:
WWAN cards and most card readers use USB, Firewire adapters generally
use PCIx).

So if your statement is correct, I'd speculate on a
"thunderbolt-to-Expresscard" adapter also being just wiring and
consequently not requiring additional driver support.  If that were the
case, this could be a way to use an existing Expresscard Firewire
adapter (and thus drivers with some expectation of working) with a
modern laptop.

--
David Kastrup
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Kastrup
In reply to this post by Michael Jarosch
Michael Jarosch <[hidden email]>
writes:

> Am Dienstag, den 03.10.2017, 14:49 -1000 schrieb David W. Jones:
>
>> I wonder if one of the FW=>Thunderbolt adaptors would work to connect
>> to a non-Mac?
>
> Assuming, Pauls conclusion is right (and it's the same thing they say
> on the FFADO-list, as well): If the chipset on the adaptor is supported
> by linux (most TI ones are a good bed AFAIK) it will work.
>
> I don't think there will ever be a USB2Firewire - and if there will be
> one, I don't think it will be capable to realise realtime-audio.

I think USB2.0 and following allow for reserving realtime slots, and
USB3 finally should also have the necessary bandwidth.  But the
prospective market for USB->Firewire adapters does not really make
developing a useful chipset and driver support attractive.

There _are_ dirt-cheap USB2->FW cables to be found on Ebay, however
(they are cheaper than proper Firewire cables, presumably because the
USB connector is cheaper).  Their pricing does not really seem
compatible with active components, but I haven't tried.

--
David Kastrup
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

Anders Hellquist
Hi !

From what I have heard, You should be able to run the Apple Thunderbolt -> Firewire adaptor but AFAIK the linux kernel do not support hot-plugging so you need to boot with the adaptor in place.
Maybe the hot-pluggin is working now (it was more than a year ago i heard this info) I have an adaptor but have not tried this myself unfortunately.


Also make sure the Thunderbolt socket is a real Thunderbolt connector and not just a mini-displayport. They look identical and works similar but mini-displayport is just a sub-set for diplay connections.

/Anders

2017-10-04 8:52 GMT+02:00 David Kastrup <[hidden email]>:
Michael Jarosch <[hidden email]>
writes:

> Am Dienstag, den 03.10.2017, 14:49 -1000 schrieb David W. Jones:
>
>> I wonder if one of the FW=>Thunderbolt adaptors would work to connect
>> to a non-Mac?
>
> Assuming, Pauls conclusion is right (and it's the same thing they say
> on the FFADO-list, as well): If the chipset on the adaptor is supported
> by linux (most TI ones are a good bed AFAIK) it will work.
>
> I don't think there will ever be a USB2Firewire - and if there will be
> one, I don't think it will be capable to realise realtime-audio.

I think USB2.0 and following allow for reserving realtime slots, and
USB3 finally should also have the necessary bandwidth.  But the
prospective market for USB->Firewire adapters does not really make
developing a useful chipset and driver support attractive.

There _are_ dirt-cheap USB2->FW cables to be found on Ebay, however
(they are cheaper than proper Firewire cables, presumably because the
USB connector is cheaper).  Their pricing does not really seem
compatible with active components, but I haven't tried.

--
David Kastrup
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

Bernardo Barros-2
In reply to this post by Paul Davis
On 10/3/17 19:52, Paul Davis wrote:
> as a clarification, perhaps: thunderbolt, in essence, is just a way to
> "export" the PCI(x) bus to outside the chassis, with safe hot-plugging.
>
> connecting via thunderbolt is semantically and functionally almost
> precisely equivalent to plugging into the backplace of the motherboard.
>

So it "should work" but maybe not?


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

Bernardo Barros-2
In reply to this post by David Kastrup
On 10/3/17 17:50, David Kastrup wrote:
> Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?

So it works for you? I will verify if thinkpads still have expresscard.
I was by a System76 employee that although their models have
expresscard, it won't work just like a firewire IO
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Kastrup
Bernardo Barros <bernardo.barros-RWB/[hidden email]> writes:

> On 10/3/17 17:50, David Kastrup wrote:
>> Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?
>
> So it works for you?

I have one Expresscard with IT chipset

05:00.0 PCI bridge: Texas Instruments XIO2000(A)/XIO2200A PCI Express-to-PCI Bridge (rev 03)
06:00.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Texas Instruments XIO2200A IEEE-1394a-2000 Controller (PHY/Link) (rev 01)

that works for me _if_ I boot with the card (there are some ways of
removing and reinserting it that will also keep it working, but you have
to have booted with it first, and reinsertion while the laptop is live
rather than asleep in some manner won't do either).

That's usually the one advertised as "with TI chipset".  Some reports of
Linux/Firewire users/developers decry the internal PCIx/PCI bridge as
slow and buggy and I suspect it to be responsible for the hotplugging
problems, but when booting with it, this has been the most reliable
Firewire interface for me yet (only tested 400Mbps ones, including the
Ricoh built into the T61 laptop).

I have one that is proper PCIe without bridge.  Let me check:

05:00.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): VIA Technologies, Inc. VT6315 Series Firewire Controller

This one has smaller buffers and will crash/hang sometimes.

I also have some Cardbus card (some NEC chip) which will not enter
synchronous connections (astonishingly, it will work with an Apple
iSight camera but not with audio cards).  Basically, Cardbus was no
longer of interest when the "new Firewire stack" was created, and the
old one is no longer available.  So don't weep after Cardbus cards.  Not
that you likely can, anyway.

> I will verify if thinkpads still have expresscard. I was by a System76
> employee that although their models have expresscard, it won't work
> just like a firewire IO

The Expresscards are OEMed to silliness.  My good one (Delock, TI
XIO2200A) has a sequence of equal-length ridges across it.  The
problematic one (MS-Tech, Via VT6315) has a sequence of increasing size
ellipse indentations across it.  Either are 34mm Expresscards, have a
connector for 12V at the side and two 6-pin IEEE1394a connectors at the
front.

You'll probably find a slew of other providers for the same cards,
differing only in the product labels glued on.  It's stupid to go by
plastic ridges, but probably more reliable than the product name unless
a particular chipset is documented.

--
David Kastrup
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Jones


On October 6, 2017 10:24:33 AM HST, David Kastrup <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Bernardo Barros <bernardo.barros-RWB/[hidden email]> writes:
>
> > On 10/3/17 17:50, David Kastrup wrote:
> >> Do modern laptops still have Expresscard slots?
> >
> > So it works for you?
>
> I have one Expresscard with IT chipset
>
> 05:00.0 PCI bridge: Texas Instruments XIO2000(A)/XIO2200A PCI
> Express-to-PCI Bridge (rev 03)
> 06:00.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Texas Instruments XIO2200A
> IEEE-1394a-2000 Controller (PHY/Link) (rev 01)
>
> that works for me _if_ I boot with the card (there are some ways of
> removing and reinserting it that will also keep it working, but you
> have
> to have booted with it first, and reinsertion while the laptop is live
> rather than asleep in some manner won't do either).
>
> That's usually the one advertised as "with TI chipset".  Some reports
> of
> Linux/Firewire users/developers decry the internal PCIx/PCI bridge as
> slow and buggy and I suspect it to be responsible for the hotplugging
> problems, but when booting with it, this has been the most reliable
> Firewire interface for me yet (only tested 400Mbps ones, including the
> Ricoh built into the T61 laptop).
>
> I have one that is proper PCIe without bridge.  Let me check:
>
> 05:00.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): VIA Technologies, Inc. VT6315 Series
> Firewire Controller
>
> This one has smaller buffers and will crash/hang sometimes.
>
> I also have some Cardbus card (some NEC chip) which will not enter
> synchronous connections (astonishingly, it will work with an Apple
> iSight camera but not with audio cards).  Basically, Cardbus was no
> longer of interest when the "new Firewire stack" was created, and the
> old one is no longer available.  So don't weep after Cardbus cards.
> Not
> that you likely can, anyway.
>
> > I will verify if thinkpads still have expresscard. I was by a
> System76
> > employee that although their models have expresscard, it won't work
> > just like a firewire IO
>
> The Expresscards are OEMed to silliness.  My good one (Delock, TI
> XIO2200A) has a sequence of equal-length ridges across it.  The
> problematic one (MS-Tech, Via VT6315) has a sequence of increasing
> size
> ellipse indentations across it.  Either are 34mm Expresscards, have a
> connector for 12V at the side and two 6-pin IEEE1394a connectors at
> the
> front.
>
> You'll probably find a slew of other providers for the same cards,
> differing only in the product labels glued on.  It's stupid to go by
> plastic ridges, but probably more reliable than the product name
> unless
> a particular chipset is documented.

I have a System76 laptop. There's no Expresscard port on it.

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com

Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Kastrup
"David W. Jones" <[hidden email]> writes:

> I have a System76 laptop. There's no Expresscard port on it.

On their current baseline "Lemur" model I see

Expansion: USB 3.1 Type-C, USB 3.0 Type-A, USB 2.0 Type-A, SD Card Reader

That's sort-of "ugh" for connecting Firewire devices.  Concerning the
bandwidth, I think you'd need USB 3 (USB 2.0 nominally has 480mbps over
Firewire's 400mbps but reserves less for synchronous transfers and there
are other problems IIRC).

I don't know about reliable adapters, but I haven't looked.

--
David Kastrup
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Jones
On 10/06/2017 11:06 PM, David Kastrup wrote:

> "David W. Jones" <[hidden email]> writes:
>
>> I have a System76 laptop. There's no Expresscard port on it.
>
> On their current baseline "Lemur" model I see
>
> Expansion: USB 3.1 Type-C, USB 3.0 Type-A, USB 2.0 Type-A, SD Card Reader
>
> That's sort-of "ugh" for connecting Firewire devices.  Concerning the
> bandwidth, I think you'd need USB 3 (USB 2.0 nominally has 480mbps over
> Firewire's 400mbps but reserves less for synchronous transfers and there
> are other problems IIRC).

I have a Gazelle Pro 9 (Gaze09 model), vs the current gaze12 model.

Expansion

2× USB 3.0 Type-A, 1× USB 3.0 Type-C, 1× USB 2.0 Type-A, SD Card Reader

> I don't know about reliable adapters, but I haven't looked.

I've got to try some. The only other option I would have would be to use
it on one of my desktop systems, which aren't exactly very portable!

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Jones
On 10/08/2017 06:05 PM, david wrote:

> On 10/06/2017 11:06 PM, David Kastrup wrote:
>> "David W. Jones" <[hidden email]> writes:
>>
>>> I have a System76 laptop. There's no Expresscard port on it.
>>
>> On their current baseline "Lemur" model I see
>>
>> Expansion: USB 3.1 Type-C, USB 3.0 Type-A, USB 2.0 Type-A, SD Card Reader
>>
>> That's sort-of "ugh" for connecting Firewire devices.  Concerning the
>> bandwidth, I think you'd need USB 3 (USB 2.0 nominally has 480mbps over
>> Firewire's 400mbps but reserves less for synchronous transfers and there
>> are other problems IIRC).
>
>> I don't know about reliable adapters, but I haven't looked.
>
> I've got to try some. The only other option I would have would be to use
> it on one of my desktop systems, which aren't exactly very portable!

I've been poking around on Amazon. The consensus of reviewers seems to
that USB-C to Firewire adapters don't work and simply cannot work.
Including a review by an electrical engineer.

I found this USB<>ExpressCard adaptor:

https://www.amazon.com/SIIG-USB-to-ExpressCard-JU-EP0012-S1/dp/B001KUOW9O/ref=sr_1_29?ie=UTF8&qid=1507524480&sr=8-29&keywords=firewire+to+usb+adapter

IIRC, the original poster had a Firewire ExpressCard and was looking for
a laptop with an ExpressCard port. Maybe this would work for them?

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Kastrup
david <[hidden email]> writes:

> On 10/08/2017 06:05 PM, david wrote:
>> On 10/06/2017 11:06 PM, David Kastrup wrote:
>>> "David W. Jones" <[hidden email]> writes:
>>>
>>>> I have a System76 laptop. There's no Expresscard port on it.
>>>
>>> On their current baseline "Lemur" model I see
>>>
>>> Expansion: USB 3.1 Type-C, USB 3.0 Type-A, USB 2.0 Type-A, SD Card Reader
>>>
>>> That's sort-of "ugh" for connecting Firewire devices.  Concerning the
>>> bandwidth, I think you'd need USB 3 (USB 2.0 nominally has 480mbps over
>>> Firewire's 400mbps but reserves less for synchronous transfers and there
>>> are other problems IIRC).
>>
>>> I don't know about reliable adapters, but I haven't looked.
>>
>> I've got to try some. The only other option I would have would be to
>> use it on one of my desktop systems, which aren't exactly very
>> portable!
>
> I've been poking around on Amazon. The consensus of reviewers seems to
> that USB-C to Firewire adapters don't work and simply cannot
> work. Including a review by an electrical engineer.
>
> I found this USB<>ExpressCard adaptor:
>
> https://www.amazon.com/SIIG-USB-to-ExpressCard-JU-EP0012-S1/dp/B001KUOW9O/ref=sr_1_29?ie=UTF8&qid=1507524480&sr=8-29&keywords=firewire+to+usb+adapter

Don't bother.  "Add support for USB-based ExpressCard devices to any USB
equipped computer" is actually a lot more explicit than many of those
cards bother telling, and it means that they work fine for WWAN cards
(UMTS Modem and such), Smartcard readers and reasonably cheap (all but
the fastest) flash device reader cards.  An Expresscard slot provides
both a PCIx lane and a USB connection.  This adapter will only provide
the USB connection.  That's not sufficient for a Firewire adapter.

> IIRC, the original poster had a Firewire ExpressCard and was looking
> for a laptop with an ExpressCard port. Maybe this would work for them?

Nope.

--
David Kastrup
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: firewire-thunderbolt adapter?

David Jones
On 10/08/2017 09:31 PM, David Kastrup wrote:

> david <[hidden email]> writes:
>
>> I've been poking around on Amazon. The consensus of reviewers seems to
>> that USB-C to Firewire adapters don't work and simply cannot
>> work. Including a review by an electrical engineer.
>>
>> I found this USB<>ExpressCard adaptor:
>>
>> https://www.amazon.com/SIIG-USB-to-ExpressCard-JU-EP0012-S1/dp/B001KUOW9O/ref=sr_1_29?ie=UTF8&qid=1507524480&sr=8-29&keywords=firewire+to+usb+adapter
>
> Don't bother.  "Add support for USB-based ExpressCard devices to any USB
> equipped computer" is actually a lot more explicit than many of those
> cards bother telling, and it means that they work fine for WWAN cards
> (UMTS Modem and such), Smartcard readers and reasonably cheap (all but
> the fastest) flash device reader cards.  An Expresscard slot provides
> both a PCIx lane and a USB connection.  This adapter will only provide
> the USB connection.  That's not sufficient for a Firewire adapter.
>
>> IIRC, the original poster had a Firewire ExpressCard and was looking
>> for a laptop with an ExpressCard port. Maybe this would work for them?
>
> Nope.

Bummer. Guess I'll have to go through my accumulated emails for
recommendations for a PCIx Firewire card for the desktop machine.

--
David W. Jones
[hidden email]
authenticity, honesty, community
http://dancingtreefrog.com
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
12